Sources Of Vitamin B1

Vitamin B1 – thiamine – Other names – Thiamine, thiamine hydrochloride, thiamin – Summary – Thiamin is taken orally to prevent beriberi, a deficiency syndrome that affects the heart, gastrointestinal tract and nerve system. Signs of thiamin deficiency include tingling and numbness in the hands and legs, irritability, fatigue, weakness and muscle cramps in the legs, headache, insomnia, indigestion, weight reduction, constipation, irregular heart beat and high blood pressure level. More severe symptoms include mental deterioration, muscle wasting paralysis, nerve harm, and eventually death. Thiamin is very safe and there are no major adverse effects or toxicities associated with its oral use.

There are also few drug or supplement interactions associated with its use. Blueberries, red beet root, red cabbage, black currants, and Brussels sprouts decrease thiamin levels as does drinking large amounts of coffee and tea. Drugs used for seizures, including Dilantin, can interfere with thiamine absorption. Alcohol consumption, oral contraceptives and diuretics will also cause decreased thiamin stores. The Recommended Daily Allowance of vitamin B1 is 1.4 mg\/day for men and 1.0 mg \/day for women. Therapeutic doses range as high as 50 – 200 mg\/day. Diet sources of thiamin include Brewer’s yeast, lean pork, wheat germ, sunflower seeds, pine nuts, soybeans, and whole grain brown rice.

Uses – Thiamin is taken orally to prevent beriberi, a deficiency syndrome that affects the heart, gastrointestinal tract and nerve system. Vitamin B1 is necessary by the nerve system for it to function properly. Thiamin has been utilized to treat depression, schizophrenia, and the psychosis related to alcohol withdrawal. More frequently, reactions occur to the injectable form and include tingling, pain, sweating, nausea, uneasiness, trouble breathing, a transient decrease in blood pressure level and death. Interactions – Some foods have an effect on thiamin levels. Blueberries, red beet root, red cabbage, black currants, and Brussels sprouts decrease vitamin B1 levels.

Drinking large amounts of coffee and tea, without or with caffeine, will also decrease levels. That is due to the tannins binding thiamin in the gut. Drugs used for seizures, including Dilantin, can interfere with thiamine absorption and supplements can be necessary. Alcohol consumption, oral contraceptives and diuretics will also cause decreased thiamin stores. Magnesium supplements might need to be taken with thiamin as magnesium is needed to convert thiamin to its active form. Symptoms of Deficiency – signs of thiamin deficiency include tingling and numbness in the hands and legs, irritability, fatigue, weakness and muscle cramps in the legs, headache, insomnia, indigestion, weight reduction, constipation, irregular heart beat and high blood pressure level. More severe symptoms include mental deterioration, muscle wasting paralysis, nerve harm, and eventually death. Signs of Toxicity – The body eliminates this water soluble vitamin so no toxicity has been seen – Dosage and Administration – The Recommended Daily Allowance of vitamin B1 is 1.4 mg\/day for men and 1.0 mg \/day for women.